Florida District7 Walk Wise Workshop

Florida CTST District 7 Walk Wise Workshop


Alcohol and Impaired Driving
The following are examples of alcohol and impaired driving program activities found in community traffic safety programs:

Policies and Legislation

  • State Laws on Administrative License Revocation, .08 BAC per se, and Zero Tolerance (.02 BAC or less) for drivers under 21 years of age and Graduated Licensing.

Organizational Practices

  • Frequent sobriety checkpoints with strong community awareness
  • Multi-agency DWI patrol activity with strong community awareness
  •  School based programs such as Grad/Prom Night, Friday Night Live, Prom Promise and Students Against Driving Drunk (SADD)
  • Youth enforcement programs targeting alcohol sales to minors, keg parties attended by underage drinkers, etc.
  • Training for judges and prosecutors on DWI law issues
  • Police training in DWI Detection, Drug Evaluation and Classification and Standardized Field Sobriety Testing
  • Alcohol training programs for servers and sellers of alcohol.

Coalitions and Networks

  • Community coalitions to support activities to stop drunk driving such as Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) or Remove Intoxicated Drivers (RID)
  •  Employer coalitions promoting alcohol and traffic safety issues such as Network of Employers for Traffic Safety (NETS)

Community Information and Education

  • Drunk & Drugged Driving Prevention Month (3D Month) program and other public information activity

Evaluate Your Program
To measure progress in your alcohol program look at trend data for the following measures:

  • Alcohol related fatalities and injuries (all ages)
  • Percent of drinking drivers ages 15-19, in fatal or injury crashes (The 15 to 19 year old age group is suggested to better target the analysis.)


Occupant Protection
The following are examples of occupant protection activities found in community traffic safety programs:

Policy and Legislation

  • Standard (primary) safety belt law or ordinance (or safety belt usage of 80% or more)
  • Upgraded child passenger safety laws

Organizational Practices

  • Birthing hospital policy requiring child safety seat usage for discharged newborns
  • Regular targeted occupant protection enforcement for low usage groups such as children 0-4, teen drivers, etc.
  • Occupant protection checkpoints and clinics on correct use of child safety seats
  • Community low/no cost child safety seat program

Coalitions and Networks

  • Coalitions, such as Safe Kids, promoting child safety seat issues

Community Information and Education

  • Public information for National Child Passenger Safety Week in February and Buckle Up America! Week in May
  • Public information on law enforcement activity to increase and maintain high safety belt and child safety seat use levels
  • Correct usage workshops and clinics for child safety seats

Evaluate Your Program
To measure progress in your occupant protection program look at trend data for the following measures:

  • Safety belt and child safety seat usage determined by observational surveys (all ages)
  • Safety belt use percentage in fatalities and injuries (all ages)
  • Child safety seat usage in fatalities and injuries for children 0-4
  • Safety belt use in fatalities and injuries, age 15-19 (teenagers)



Distracted Driving
The following are examples of distracted driving prevention program activities found in community traffic safety programs. Distracted driving has been identified as one of the most deadly activities a motorist can perform while driving – even surpasses the dangers of impaired driving. The following activities can be found in community traffic safety programs:

Policy and Legislation

  • Work to encourage State legislatures to pass primary (standard) anti-texting/hand held cell phone use bans in every State
  • Work for passage of laws that make texting and talking on a hand-held cell phone a primary offense
  • Work to make fines for texting and hand-held cell phone violations strong enough to deter violators
  • Studies for similar laws, like mandatory seat belt use, show that higher fines lead to higher compliance rates
  • Work with your campaign’s legislative partners (law enforcement, health care and medical communities, etc.) to inform law makers about the dangers of distracted driving
  • Involve all campaign partners to advocate for passage of primary enforcement laws that ban texting and hand-held cell phone use.

Community Information and Education

  • Generate awareness about “One Text or Call Could Wreck It All.” and encourage community partners to join the “One Text or Call Could Wreck It All” cause
  • Use ALL campaign partners to educate the public that distracted drivers are not only a danger to themselves, but everyone else on the road around them
  • Educate the public on the benefits of laws that ban hand-held cell phone use and texting

Organizational Practices

  • Lead by example: make sure that you put your cell phone down and do not engage in any activity that takes your mind or eyes off the road or hands off the wheel

Evaluate Your Program
To measure progress in your distracted driving programs look at trend data for the following evaluation measures:

  • Number of vehicles involved in distracted driving crashes
  • Distribution and number of fatal and injury crashes by contributing factors such as texting, teens with passengers, cell phone use, other distractive behaviors, etc.


Aggressive Driver Prevention Programs and Speed Management
The following are examples of speed management and aggressive driving prevention program activities found in community traffic safety programs. A speed management program is designed to establish speed management on all roads in a community. The term “aggressive driving” includes driver actions such as speeding, failure to yield, hit and run and many more. Also, it covers unlicensed and suspended drivers.

Policy and Legislation

  • Vehicle impoundment law or ordinance allowing impoundment of vehicles driven by unlicensed or suspended drivers
  • “Double fine” program to reduce persistent speeding and aggressive driving violations
  • Ensuring that posted speed limits are reasonable and appropriate for conditions
  • Providing public information and education on the risks associated with speeding
  • Understanding who speeds, where, when, and why
  • Using a variety of techniques and technologies beyond enforcement for speed management
  • Targeting enforcement where speeding presents the most serious hazard and accompanying it with public information and education

Organizational Practices

  • Appropriate design speed and traffic calming measures
  • Speed management and aggressive driving enforcement programs
  • Red light running intersection safety program
  • Commitment to using both traditional methods and state-of-the-art equipment in setting and enforcing speed limits
  • Systematic program of speed surveys
  • Training of judicial, prosecutors and law enforcement on consequences of speeding and aggressive driving

Community Information and Education

  • Public information program on speed management and aggressive driving aimed at increasing driver compliance with traffic safety laws
  • Public information and education program on speeding and driving too fast for conditions

Evaluate Your Program
To measure progress in your speed management and aggressive driver programs look at trend data for the following evaluation measures:

  • Number of vehicles exceeding posted speed limits (monitoring)
  • Distribution and number of fatal and injury crashes by contributing factors such as speeding, aggressive driving, hit and run, etc
  • Number of crashes in which driver was unlicensed, suspended, or revoked

 

Motorcycle Safety Program
The following are examples of motorcycle safety program activities found in community traffic safety programs:

Policy and Legislation

  • Law/ordinance requiring helmets for all riders (universal helmet law)

Organizational Practices

  • Enforcement of requirement for motorcycle license endorsement and proper helmet use
  • Community motorcycle safety education available for new riders
  • Enforcement of impaired driving laws for motorcyclists

Coalitions and Networks

  • Coalition of persons from law enforcement, medicine, health, injury prevention, education, and safety to promote proper helmet usage

Community Information and Education

  • Public information promoting licensing, motorcycle safety, dangers of impaired riding, and proper helmet usage

Evaluate Your Program

To measure progress in your motorcycle program look at trend data for the following measures:

  • Motorcycle helmet use in fatal and injury crashes
  • License status in fatal and injury crashes
  • Motorcycle helmet usage determined by observational surveys (all ages)

 

Youth Programs
For information on best practices for youth programs, please refer to prior program areas that list youth activities as part of their strategies area.


Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
The following are examples of emergency medical services activities found in community traffic safety programs:

Policies and Legislation

  • State EMS Authority responsible for overall planning, development of EMS systems and certification of personnel and training

Organizational Practices

  • All emergency response personnel meet recommended State established training standards
  • All emergency response vehicles meet State equipment standards
  • Available rescue resources with extrication equipment
  • First responder training available to law enforcement, school and public work employees, and volunteers
  • Established Trauma Registry as well as EMS response and activity data
  • Communication system capable of on-line medical direction and transmission of real-time patient data
  • Quality improvement throughout the EMS system

Coalitions and Networks

  • Coalition such as EMS injury control coalition and Safe Kids to promote the EMS goals in the community
  • Collaborative working relationship with law enforcement and the State Highway Safety Office

Community Information and Education

  • Public Information supporting National EMS Week in May
  • Public information about preventing injuries, how to access the EMS system, and what to do until help arrives.

Evaluate Your Program

To measure progress in your EMS program look at trend data for the following measures:

  • Response time from EMS notification to arrival at crash scene
  • Time of crash to arrival at hospital

Roadway Safety Programs
The following are examples of roadway safety program activities found in community traffic safety programs:
Organizational Practices

  • Systematic maintenance of signs, markings and signals
  • Systematic process for identifying known and potentially hazardous locations
  • Systematic program of speed surveys
  • Crosswalk and bike lane marking and signal program
  • Work Zone safety program
  • Use of rumble strips



Railroad Safety
The following are examples of railroad safety activities found in community traffic safety programs:

  • Crossing safety and trespass prevention programs
  • Partnership with local and railroad law enforcement officers
  • Inventory of crossings and signal devices
  • Systematic coordination in maintenance of railroad signs, markings, signals and equipment
  • Priority list for upgrading railroad grade crossings

Evaluate Your Program

To measure progress in your roadway safety and railroad safety programs look at trend data for the following measures:

  • Number of crashes with roadside fixed objects
  • Statistics on collisions, fatalities and injuries at rail rights - of-way



Program Self-Sufficiency
The following are examples of support activities found in community traffic safety programs and are effective in obtaining funds to support traffic safety programs:

Policies and Legislation

  • Penalty assessment on motor vehicle violations
  • Cost recovery program for the cost of emergency response
  • A surcharge on alcohol sales to fund local DWI programs

Program Evaluation
Analysis of Traffic Safety Impact
To evaluate the impact of your community traffic safety program, look at the following evaluation measures over a four- or five-year period to determine change in trend and level of injury. Also, a comparison of community data to the state average and cities of comparable size is recommended as a way to determine impact.

Overall Evaluation

  • Total motor vehicle fatal and injury crashes
  • Total motor vehicle fatalities and injuries
  • Individual Countermeasure Activity Areas
  • Alcohol related fatalities and injuries (all ages)
  • Percent of drivers, 15-19 ( representative of teen age group) in fatal and injury crashes who had been drinking or using other drugs
  • Safety belt use percentage in fatalities & injuries (all ages)
  • Child safety seat usage in fatalities and injuries for children 0-4
  • Motorcycle helmet use in fatal and injury crashes
  • Observational survey data for safety belt, child safety seat and motorcycle helmet usage
  • Pedestrian fatalities and injuries in intersections and crosswalks
  • Bicycle fatalities and injuries by age and helmet usage
  • Number of Hit and Run crashes
  • Number of crashes of drivers unlicensed, suspended or revoked
  • Number of crashes with roadside fixed objects
  • Number of fatal and injury crashes at railroad grade crossings
  • Number of fatal and injury run-off-the road crashes



Cost Impact of a Safe Community Project
For those communities successful in showing impact in the program areas addressed in their community traffic safety coalition, a cost benefit analysis should be performed.

A useful publication is “The Economic Costs of Motor Vehicle Crashes 2002”, available from NHTSA’s online catalog ordering system.

   
Explore
Overview
Building Coalitions
Processes and Activities
Sustaining Coalitions
Contact Us
 
Partnerships
State Coalitions and Links
Multicultural Organizations
NHTSA Regions and States
National IP Partners
 
Town Square
Newsletter and Archives
Fresh Ideas  
Coalition Activities  
Training and Events  
Mobilizations and Crackdowns
 
Product Shop
NHTSA Materials Catalog
Community Toolkit
Resource Library
NHTSA Image Library
Traffic Safety Marketing
Parents Portal
SAFETY 1N NUM3ERS


Return to Home Page