September, 2005

Summaries of Published Evaluation Reports

A systematic program to evaluate the effectiveness of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) was initiated in 1975, when NHTSA was just beginning to establish its own crash databases. The first "preliminary" evaluation of a standard was published in 1979 (side door strength) and the first "final" evaluations in 1981 (energy-absorbing steering assemblies, bumpers). Since 1979, 53 comprehensive evaluations of regulations, safety programs, consumer information programs, or safety technologies have been published. Here is a list of the 53 studies including summaries of principal findings [except where findings were superseded in a follow-up evaluation]:

2005

Trends in the Static Stability Factor of Passenger Cars, Light Trucks and Vans (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 868)

The static stability factor (SSF) is a measurement of a vehicle's resistance to rollover. NHTSA has included rollover information as part of its NCAP ratings since model year 2001. Passenger cars have the highest average SSF, and they have remained high. SUVs have substantially improved their SSF values over time, especially after model year 2000, whereas those of pickup trucks have remained consistent over the years. Minivans showed considerable improvement since they were first introduced. In model year 2003, the sales-weighted average SSF was 1.41 for passenger cars, 1.17 for SUVs, 1.18 for pickup trucks, 1.24 for minivans, and 1.12 for full-size vans.

2004

Cost Per Life Saved by the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 835)

NHTSA has evaluated the life-saving benefits as well as the consumer cost for a substantial "core" group of safety technologies for passenger cars and LTVs (pickup trucks, SUVs and vans). In 2002, these technologies added an estimated $11,353,000,000 (in 2002 Dollars) to the consumer cost of new cars and LTVs of that model year, while saving 20,851 lives in the vehicles on the road during that calendar year. That amounts to $544,482 per life saved in 2002. They added $189,842,000,000 to the cost of new cars and LTVs over model years 1968-2002, while saving 252,989 lives in model year 1968 and later vehicles during calendar years 1968-2002. That amounts to $750,782 per life saved in 1968-2002.

Cost and Weight Added by the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards for Model Years 1968-2001 in Passenger Cars and Light Trucks (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 834)

NHTSA performs engineering "teardown" analyses to estimate how much specific FMVSS add to the weight and the retail price of vehicles. NHTSA has evaluated virtually all the cost-and weight-adding technologies introduced by 2001 in cars and LTVs in response to the FMVSS. NHTSA estimates that the FMVSS added an average of $839 (in 2002 dollars) and 125 pounds to the average passenger car in model year 2001. This was approximately 4 percent of the cost and 4 percent of the weight of a new car. An average of $711 (in 2002 dollars) and 86 pounds was added to the average LTV in model year 2001. This was approximately 3 percent of the cost and 2 percent of the weight of a new light truck.

Lives Saved by the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards and Other Vehicle Safety Technologies, 1960-2002 - Passenger Cars and Light Trucks - With a Review of 19 FMVSS and their Effectiveness in Reducing Fatalities, Injuries and Crashes (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 833)

NHTSA has evaluated the effectiveness of virtually all the life-saving technologies introduced in passenger cars, pickup trucks, SUVs and vans from about 1960 up through the later 1990's. A statistical model estimates the number of lives saved from 1960 to 2002 by the combination of these technologies - including safety equipment meeting specific FMVSS, equipment installed in advance of the FMVSS, and non-compulsory improvements such as the redesign of mid and lower instrument panels. Vehicle safety technologies saved an estimated 328,551 lives from 1960 through 2002. The annual number of lives saved grew steadily from 115 in 1960 to 24,561 in 2002.

Impaired-Driving Program Assessments: A Summary of Recommendations (1991 to 2003) (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 815)

NHTSA's assessment process allows States to have their impaired-driving programs reviewed by outside teams of nationally recognized experts. NHTSA examined 38 State assessment reports. Most of the teams' 2,982 individual recommendations fit into 10 thematic areas: (1) enforcement and the arrest, prosecution, and adjudication process; (2) public information and education; (3) DUI data and records; (4) enacting or revising laws; (5) enhanced training for personnel; (6) program evaluation; (7) resources for treatment and rehabilitation; (8) inter/intra-governmental coordination; (9) sources of funding; and (10) task forces and/or community involvement.

Preliminary Results Analyzing the Effectiveness of Electronic Stability Control (ESC) Systems (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 790)

ESC systems detect when a vehicle is about to go out of control and automatically intervene by applying the brakes to individual wheels and possibly reducing engine torque to help the driver stay on course. Preliminary analyses found statistically significant crash reductions in certain luxury passenger cars and SUVs currently equipped with ESC systems. Single vehicle crashes were reduced by 35 percent in passenger cars and by 67 percent in SUVs. Fatal single vehicle crashes were reduced by 30 percent in cars and by 63 percent in SUVs.

Evaluation of Rear Window Defrosting and Defogging Systems (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 724)

Almost all new cars, minivans and SUVs have rear window defoggers, even though Federal standards do not require them. Analyses of crashes where drivers were backing up or changing lanes during rain or snow, early morning hours, or in the winter did not show a statistically significant reduction with defoggers. Nevertheless, NHTSA would expect consumers to continue wanting rear window defoggers for their vehicles because they conveniently clear condensation, frost, ice, and/or snow from the back window.

Evaluation of FMVSS 214 Side Impact Protection for Light Trucks: Crush Resistance Requirements for Side Doors (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 719)

Light trucks (pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles) were required to meet a crush resistance standard for side doors beginning September 1, 1993. Side door beams were installed to reduce the velocity and depth of door intrusion in side impact crashes. The beams are estimated to reduce fatalities by 19 percent in single vehicle side impacts. When all light trucks on the road have head restraints, they will save an estimated 151 lives per year. Little or no fatality reduction was found in multivehicle crashes.

2003

Results of the Survey on the Use of Passenger Air Bag On-Off Switches (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 689)

On-off switches allow drivers to temporarily deactivate air bags when children must ride in the front seat of pickup trucks and other vehicles that cannot accommodate rear-facing child safety seats in the back seat. NHTSA recommends that passenger air bag be turned off when a child age 12 or younger must ride in the front seat, and turned on if all front-seat occupants are age 13 or older. In a 2000 survey, switches were left on for 14 percent of infants and 26 percent of child passengers age 1-6, but turned off for 17 percent of the adult passengers.

Vehicle Weight, Fatality Risk and Crash Compatibility of Model Year 1991-99 Passenger Cars and Light Trucks (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 662)

There is little association between vehicle weight and fatal-crash rates in the heavier light trucks and vans. However, in other groups of model year 1991-99 vehicles, fatality rates increased as weights decreased. Pickup trucks and SUVs of these model years had, on the average, higher fatality rates than passenger cars or minivans of comparable weight. Model year 1991-99 light trucks and vans, especially those with high, rigid frontal structures, were more aggressive than cars when they struck other vehicles.

NCAP Test Improvements with Pretensioners and Load Limiters (NHTSA Publications DOT HS 809 562 and DOT HS 809 563)

Safety belt pretensioners pull belts snug as a crash begins. Load limiters allow belts to yield slightly during a crash to reduce the force on the wearer's chest. In New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) frontal barrier crashes at 35 mph, the combination of pretensioners and load limiters reduced average Head Injury Criterion (HIC) by 232, chest acceleration by 6.6 g's and chest deflection by 10.6 mm, for driver and right front passenger dummies, relative to cars and light trucks of the same make-models without these features.

2002

Evaluation of Child Safety Seat Registration (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 518)

Since March 1993, manufacturers of child safety seats have been required to provide a postage-paid registration form with each new child safety seat. Seat registration has increased from 3 percent prior to 1993 to 27 percent in 1996-2000. The repair rate for recalled child safety seats increased from 13.8 percent prior to 1993 to 21.5 percent.

Preliminary Report: The Incidence Rate of Odometer Fraud (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 441)

There are an estimated 452,000 cases of odometer rollback per year in the United States. The difference between the inflated prices that consumers paid for rolled-back vehicles and the prices they would have been willing to pay if they had known the true mileage average $2,336 per case of odometer rollback, amounting to $1,056 million per year in the United States.

2001

The Effectiveness of Head Restraints in Light Trucks (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 247)

The purpose of a head restraint is to prevent whiplash injuries in rear-impact crashes. Head restraints reduce overall injury risk in light trucks in rear impacts by a statistically significant 6 percent. When all light trucks on the road have head restraints, they will be preventing approximately 15,000 nonfatal injuries per year. (See also the 1982 evaluation of head restraints in passenger cars.)

The Effectiveness of Retroreflective Tape on Heavy Trailers (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 222)

Retroreflective tape enhances the visibility of heavy trailers in the dark. The tape reduces side and rear impacts by other vehicles into trailers by 29 percent in dark conditions (including dark-not-lighted, dark-lighted, dawn and dusk). In dark-not-lighted conditions, the tape reduces side and rear impacts by 41 percent. When all heavy trailers have the tape, it will prevent an estimated 191-350 fatalities, 3,100-5,000 injuries and 7,800 crashes per year.

Evaluation of the American Automobile Labeling Act (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 208)

In a survey of 646 recent or imminent new-vehicle buyers, over 75 percent were unaware of the existence of automobile parts content labels. Among those who had read the labels, many said they used the country-of-assembly information, but none said they used the numerical U.S./Canadian parts content score. Overall U.S./Canadian parts content in new cars and light trucks dropped from an average of 70 percent in model year 1995 to 67.6 percent in 1998. However, it increased from 47 to 59 percent in transplants while dropping from 89 to 84 percent in Big 3 vehicles: trends undoubtedly influenced by the 1995 U.S.-Japan Agreement on Autos and Auto Parts and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

2000

Fatality Reduction by Safety Belts for Front-Seat Occupants of Cars and Light Trucks: Updated and Expanded Estimates Based on 1986-99 FARS Data (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 199)

Manual three-point belts reduce fatality risk, relative to the unrestrained front-seat occupant, by 45 percent in passenger cars and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, vans and sport utility vehicles. The analyses reconfirm the agency's earlier (1984-89) estimates of fatality reduction.

1999

Evaluation of FMVSS 214 - Side Impact Protection: Dynamic Performance Requirement (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 809 004)

The test injury criterion TTI(d) has a statistically significant association with fatality risk in actual side-impact crashes on the highway. In model years 1981-93 cars, make-models with low TTI(d) on the FMVSS 214 test tend to have low fatality risk. The relationship is stronger in 2-door than 4-door cars. Reducing TTI(d) by one unit is associated with an estimated 0.927 percent reduction of fatality risk in side impacts of 2-door cars. The association in the corresponding analysis of 4-door cars was not statistically significant.

Effectiveness of Lap/Shoulder Belts in the Back Outboard Seating Positions (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 945)

Lap/shoulder belts reduce fatality risk by 44 percent relative to unrestrained back-seat occupants of passenger cars, and by 15 percent relative to lap-belted occupants. Lap belts reduce fatality risk by 32 percent relative to unrestrained occupants. Lap/shoulder belts are effective in all crashes, but lap belts only in nonfrontal crashes. Lap-belted occupants have substantially higher abdominal-injury risk than unrestrained back-seat occupants in frontal crashes, but lap/shoulder belts reduce abdominal injuries by 52 percent and head injuries by 47 percent relative to lap belts.

1998

Highway Safety Assessment: A Summary of Findings in Ten States (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 796)

Assessment of 1980-1993 safety programs in ten states showed that Federal grants and technology were used to address safety priorities as intended by Congress. Federal grants, amounting to less than two percent of total safety spending by States and communities, have acted as seed money to resolve important highway safety problems. Programs started with Federal funds were often extended or replicated elsewhere with State funds. Occupant protection programs, however, remain heavily dependent on Federal funds.

Auto Theft and Recovery - Effects of the Anti Car Theft Act of 1992 and the Motor Vehicle Theft Law Enforcement Act of 1984 - Report to the Congress (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 761)

Theft rates, which had increased during the 1980's, declined from 714 per million in 1990 to 597 in 1995. Parts marking and factory-installed anti-theft devices have had beneficial and complementary effects on auto thefts and/or recoveries. The Acts have given law enforcement tools to deter thefts, trace stolen vehicles and parts, and apprehend and convict thieves.

The Long-Term Effectiveness of Center High Mounted Stop Lamps in Passenger Cars and Light Trucks (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 696)

Throughout 1989-95, cars equipped with Center High Mounted Stop Lamps were 4.3 percent less likely to be struck in the rear than cars without the lamps. (In 1987, when the lamps were first introduced, the reduction was 8.5 percent.) The effectiveness of CHMSL in light trucks is about the same as in cars. At the 1989-95 effectiveness level, when all cars and light trucks on the road have the lamps, they would prevent 194,000-239,000 crashes, 58,000-70,000 nonfatal injuries and $655 million in property damage per year.

1997

Relationship of Vehicle Weight to Fatality and Injury Risk in Model Year 1985-93 Passenger Cars and Light Trucks (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 569); Relationships between Vehicle Size and Fatality Risk in Model Year 1985-93 Passenger Cars and Light Trucks (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 570)

A 100-pound reduction in the weight of passenger cars, with corresponding reductions in other size parameters such as track width, is associated with an estimated increase of 302 fatalities per year. However, a 100-pound reduction in light trucks is estimated to decrease overall fatalities in crashes, including occupants of other vehicles and pedestrians, by 40 per year (not statistically significant). When light trucks are reduced in weight and size, they become less hazardous to car occupants, pedestrians, bicyclists and motorcyclists.

1996

Fatality Reduction by Air Bags: Analyses of Accident Data through Early 1996 (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 470)

Driver air bags reduce overall fatality risk by an estimated 11 percent in passenger cars and light trucks (essentially unchanged from the 1994 and 1992 NHTSA analyses). Passenger air bags are beneficial for right-front passengers age 13 or older. Air bags provide a life-saving benefit for belted as well as unbelted drivers. The fatality risk for child passengers age 0-12 in cars with passenger air bags is currently higher than in cars without them. Current air bags are significantly less effective for drivers age 70 or older than for younger drivers.

1995

Preliminary Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Antilock Brake Systems for Passenger Cars (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 206)

ABS significantly reduced multivehicle crashes on wet roads: fatal crashes by 24 percent, and nonfatal crashes by 14 percent. Fatal collisions with pedestrians and bicyclists were down a significant 27 percent. However, these reductions were offset by statistically significant increases in single vehicle, run-off-road crashes (rollovers or impacts with fixed objects). Fatal run-off-road crashes were up by 28 percent, and nonfatal crashes by 19 percent in the ABS-equipped cars, as compared to similar cars without ABS.

1994

Fatality Reduction by Automatic Occupant Protection in the United States

The fatality risk of front-outboard occupants in cars with motorized 2-point belts (without disconnect) is 6 percent lower than in cars with manual belts; the risk in cars with non-motorized 3-point belts is the same as in cars with manual belts. [This report's findings on air bags have been superseded by the 1996 evaluation - see above.]

An Evaluation of the Effects of Glass-Plastic Windshield Glazing in Passenger Cars (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 062)

Following an amendment to the glazing standard (FMVSS 205) in 1983, two manufacturers equipped some of their cars with glass-plastic windshields. Crash data indicate the injury reduction potential of these windshields is less than predicted. Fleet and warranty data show that durability problems are greater than anticipated. While glass-plastic windshields add $65 to the cost of a new car, their replacement costs are estimated to exceed $1,700.

Correlation of NCAP Performance with Fatality Risk in Actual Head-On Collisions (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 808 061)

There is a statistically significant correlation between the performance of passenger cars on the NCAP test and the fatality risk of belted drivers in actual head-on collisions. In a head-on collision between a car with "good" NCAP performance and a car of equal mass with "poor" performance, the driver of the "good" car has, on the average, about 15-25 percent lower fatality risk. The steady improvement in NCAP scores during 1979-91 was paralleled by a 20-25 percent reduction of fatality risk for belted drivers in actual head-on collisions.

1993

Preliminary Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Rear-Wheel Antilock Brake Systems for Light Trucks (Submitted to NHTSA Docket No. 70-27-GR-026)

Rear-wheel ABS significantly reduced the risk of nonfatal run-off- road crashes in light trucks: rollovers by about 30-40 percent, side impacts with fixed objects by 15-30 percent and frontal impacts with fixed objects by 5-20 percent. The reductions mostly did not carry over to fatal run-off-road crashes. Collisions with pedestrians and bicyclists were reduced by 5-15 percent. Involvements in multivehicle crashes were not reduced, and may even have increased with rear-wheel ABS.

1992

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Occupant Protection - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety FMVSS 208 - Interim Report (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 843)

Air bags and automatic belts have significantly reduced the risk of nonfatal injury and occupant ejection. [This report's findings on fatality reduction for air bags have been superseded by the 1996 evaluation; for automatic belts - by the 1994 evaluation.]

An Evaluation of the Uniform Tire Quality Grading Standards and Other Tire Labeling Requirements (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 805)

Consumers and tire dealers were surveyed about their knowledge and utilization of tire quality grades and other tire information supplied in response to Federal regulations. The ratings for treadwear were viewed as "important" by 29 percent of consumers who had recently purchased tires, and the ratings for traction, by 27 percent. The majority of consumers are not aware that these ratings are printed on the tires.

1991

Auto Theft and Recovery - Effects of the Motor Vehicle Theft Law Enforcement Act of 1984 - Report to the Congress (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 703)

[Findings have been superseded by the 1998 evaluation - see above.]

Effect of Car Size on Fatality and Injury Risk

[Findings have been superseded by the 1997 evaluation - see above.]

1990

Motor Vehicle Fires in Traffic Crashes and the Effects of the Fuel System Integrity Standard (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 675)

Modifications to fuel systems in response to FMVSS 301 reduced the frequency of fires in nonfatal crashes of passenger cars by an estimated 14 percent; fatalities in cars and light trucks, however, were not affected. During 1975-88, the number of fire-related fatalities has increased from 1,300 to 1,800, primarily due to an aging vehicle fleet.

1989

An Evaluation of Door Locks and Roof Crush Resistance of Passenger Cars - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards 206 and 216 (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 489)

Door latch improvements implemented during 1963-68 (preceding or responding to FMVSS 206) save an estimated 400 lives per year, reducing the risk of ejection in rollover crashes by 15 percent. The shift from hardtops to pillared cars with stronger roof support, in response to FMVSS 216, saves an estimated 110 lives per year.

An Evaluation of Center High Mounted Stop Lamps Based on 1987 Data (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 442)

[Findings have been superseded by the 1998 evaluation - see above.]

1988

An Evaluation of Occupant Protection in Frontal Interior Impact for Unrestrained Front Seat Occupants of Cars and Light Trucks (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 203)

During the 1960's and early 1970's, the manufacturers modified instrument panels of cars and light trucks, installing padding, reducing the rigidity of structures and extending the panel downward and toward the passenger. The improvements reduced fatality risk and serious injury risk by nearly 25 percent for unrestrained right front passengers of cars in frontal crashes, saving up to 700 lives per year.

1987

An Evaluation of the Bumper Standard - As Modified in 1982 (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 072)

To reduce regulatory burden on manufacturers, damage resistance requirements for bumpers were relaxed in model year 1983: the impact test speed was lowered from 5 to 2.5 mph. The net costs to consumers did not significantly change. A small increase in the repair cost over the lifetime of the car is offset by a reduction in the initial cost of the lighter bumpers. (See also the 1981 evaluation of bumpers.)

A Preliminary Evaluation of Seat Back Locks for Two-Door Passenger Cars with Folding Front Seatbacks (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 067)

FMVSS 207 requires a locking device for front seats with folding seatbacks, designed to limit the forward motion of the seatback in a collision. These locks or other seat components often separate at moderate crash speeds when they are impacted by back-seat occupants. No statistically significant injury or fatality reductions were found for seat back locks in any of the crash data files or in sled tests.

Fatality and Injury Reducing Effectiveness of Lap Belts for Back Seat Occupants (SAE Paper 870486)

[Findings have been superseded by the 1999 evaluation - see above.]

The Effectiveness of Center High Mounted Stop Lamps - A Preliminary Evaluation (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 807 076)

[Findings have been superseded by the 1998 evaluation - see above.]

1986

Fuel Economy and Annual Travel for Passenger Cars and Light Trucks: National On-Road Survey (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 806 971)

The actual fuel economy of model year 1978-81 vehicles was measured by a national survey in which drivers maintained log books of mileage and fuel purchases. On-road fuel economy of cars increased by 41 percent during model years 1977-81; the fuel economy of light trucks increased by 17-26 percent. However, the actual on-road fuel economy is consistently 15-20 percent below laboratory (EPA) ratings.

An Evaluation of Child Passenger Safety: The Effectiveness and Benefits of Safety Seats (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 806 890)

A correctly used safety seat reduces fatality risk by an estimated 71 percent and serious injury risk by 67 percent. But misuse can partially or completely nullify this effect. In 1984, when 39 percent of safety seats were correctly used and 61 percent were misused, the average overall fatality reduction for safety seats (correct users plus misusers) was 46 percent. In all, 192 children were saved by safety seats and lap belts in 1984.

1985

An Evaluation of Windshield Glazing and Installation Methods for Passenger Cars (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 806 693)

The High Penetration Resistant windshield doubled the impact velocity needed for the occupant's head to penetrate the windshield, reducing serious facial lacerations by 74 percent, preventing 39,000 serious lacerations and 8,000 facial fractures per year. Adhesive bonding of the windshield halved the incidence of bond separation and occupant ejection through the windshield portal in crashes, saving 105 lives per year.

1984

Effectiveness - Manual Lap and Lap/Shoulder Belts (Chapter IV-A of "Final Regulatory Impact Analysis - Amendment to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 208 - Passenger Car Front Seat Occupant Protection," NHTSA Publication DOT HS 806 572)

Manual lap-shoulder belts are estimated to reduce the fatality risk of drivers and right-front passengers by 40-50 percent [reconfirmed and superseded by the 2000 evaluation - see above], and serious injury risk by 45-55 percent, relative to an unrestrained occupant. The manual lap belt, alone, is estimated to reduce fatality risk by 30-40 percent and serious injury risk by 25-35 percent.

1983

An Evaluation of Side Marker Lamps for Cars, Trucks and Buses (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 806 430)

Side marker lamps were installed in response to FMVSS 108 to enable a driver to see another vehicle that is approaching at an angle at night. The lamps reduced nonfatal nighttime angle collisions by 16 percent, preventing 106,000 crashes, 93,000 injuries and $347 million in property damage per year. The lamps have not been effective in reducing fatalities.

A Preliminary Evaluation of Two Braking Improvements for Passenger Cars - Dual Master Cylinders and Front Disc Brakes (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 806 359)

Dual master cylinders, by providing a backup braking system in case of certain types of brake failure, prevent 40,000 crashes, 260 fatalities, 24,000 injuries and $132 million in property damage per year. Front disc brakes, which improve vehicle handling under various braking conditions, are estimated to prevent 10,000 crashes, 64 fatalities, 5,700 injuries and $32 million in property damage per year.

Evaluation of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 301-75, Fuel System Integrity: Passenger Cars (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 806 335)

[Findings have been superseded by the 1990 evaluation - see above.]

1982

An Evaluation of Side Structure Improvements in Response to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 214 (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 806 314)

Side door beams were installed in passenger cars to reduce the velocity and depth of door intrusion in side impact crashes. The beams are especially effective in side impacts with fixed objects, preventing 480 fatalities and 4,500 hospitalizations per year. In vehicle-to-vehicle side impacts, they prevent 4,900 nonfatal hospitalizations per year, but have not reduced fatality risk.

An Evaluation of Head Restraints - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 202 (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 806 108)

The purpose of a head restraint is to prevent whiplash injury in rear-impact crashes. There are integral (fixed) and adjustable head restraints; 75 percent of adjustable restraints are left in the "down" position by occupants. In 1982, integral head restraints reduced injury risk in rear impacts by 17 percent; adjustable restraints by 10 percent. The 1982 mix of head restraints prevented 64,000 whiplash injuries per year. [Subsequently, manufacturers have enlarged adjustable restraints to provide better protection, even in the "down" position. See also the 2001 evaluation of head restraints in light trucks.]

1981

An Evaluation of the Bumper Standard (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 805 866)

In order to reduce car repair costs for consumers, damage resistance tests were established for bumpers in model year 1973 and upgraded in 1974 and 1979. The bumper standards did not significantly change net costs for consumers: the savings in repair costs over the lifetime of the car are almost equal to the increase in the initial cost of the bumpers. (See also the 1987 evaluation of bumpers.)

An Evaluation of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards for Passenger Car Steering Assemblies: Standard 203 - Impact Protection for the Driver; Standard 204 - Rearward Column Displacement (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 805 705)

Energy-absorbing, telescoping steering columns reduced the risk of serious injury due to steering-assembly contact by 38 percent. Rearward column displacement was reduced by 81 percent. The standards prevent 1,300 fatalities and 23,000 hospitalizations per year. The performance of energy-absorbing steering assemblies is degraded under nonaxial impact conditions.

1979

An Evaluation of Standard 214 (NHTSA Publication DOT HS 804 858)

[Findings have been superseded by the 1982 evaluation - see above.]

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