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JUST RELEASED: Research Notes, Crash*Stats & Reports

  • NCSA’s Crash*Stat “Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First Nine Months (Jan-Sep) of 2015” (DOT HS 812 240), A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first nine months of 2015 shows that an estimated 26,000 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes. This represents an increase of about 9.3 percent as compared to the 23,796 fatalities that were reported to have occurred in the first nine months of 2014
  • NHTSA/NCSA Research Note “Retrospective Analysis of Heat Stroke Deaths of Children in Motor Vehicles Summary” (DOT HS 812 220), NHTSA collects information from death certificates to identify noncrash motor vehicle fatalities including heat-stroke-related deaths of children from birth to age 14 in motor vehicles. The underlying cause of death as noted on death certificates for cases in which heat stroke is suspected is not always heat-related and may explain why NHTSA counts are different from those reported by other sources.
  • NHTSA’s NCSA “2014 Alcohol-Impaired Driving Traffic Safety Fact Sheet” (DOT HS 812 231), In 2014, there were 9,967 fatalities in motor vehicle traffic crashes involv¬ing a driver with a BAC of .08 g/dL or higher; this was 31 percent of total traffic fatalities for the year. Among the 9,967 alcohol-impaired-driving fatalities in 2014, 69 percent (6,852) were in crashes in which at least one driver in the crash had a BAC of .15 g/dL or higher. Drivers are considered to be alcohol-impaired when their blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) are .08 grams per deciliter (g/dL) or higher. Thus, any fatal crash involving a driver with a BAC of .08 g/dL or higher is considered to be an alcohol-impaired-driving crash, and fatalities occurring in those crashes are considered to be alcohol-impaired-driving fatalities. The term “driver” refers to the operator of any motor vehicle, including a motorcycle.
  • 2014 Crash Data Key Findings (DOT HS 812 219), In 2014, 32,675 people were killed in motor vehicle crashes on U.S. roadways. An additional 2.3 million people were injured in crashes in 2014. While showing slight fluctuation in recent years, fatalities and injuries have been in a general decline. Fatalities have decreased 25 percent from 2005 to 2014 and the number of people injured has decreased 13 percent from 2005 to 2014.
  • Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First Half (Jan-Jun) of 2015 (DOT HS 812 217), A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first half of 2015 shows that an estimated 16,225 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes. This represents an increase of about 8.1 percent as compared to the 15,014 fatalities that were reported to have occurred in the first half of 2014. Preliminary data reported by the Fed¬eral Highway Administration (FHWA) shows that vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in the first 6 months of 2015 increased by about 51.9 billion miles, or about a 3.5-percent increase. The actual counts for 2014 and 2015 and the ensuing per¬centage change from 2014 to 2015 will be further revised as the final file for 2014 and the annual reporting file for 2015 become available next year. These estimates may be further refined when the projections for the first 9 months of 2015 are released in late December.
  • Lives Saved in 2014 by Restraint Use and Minimum-Drinking Age Laws (DOT HS 812 218), In 2014 the use of seat belts in passenger vehicles saved an estimated 12,802 lives (occupants 5 and older), and an estimated 2,396 lives (occupants 13 and older) were saved by frontal air bags. An estimated 252 child occupants 4 and younger were saved by the use of child restraints, and 1,669 lives were saved by the use of motorcycle helmets. An additional 2,814 lives would have been saved in 2014 if all unrestrained passenger vehicle occupants 5 and older involved in fatal crashes had worn their seat belts. If all motorcyclists had been helmeted, then an additional 660 lives would have been saved. An estimated 485 lives were saved due to minimum-drinking-age laws.
  • Find All NCSA Studies, Reports & Publications in CATS, Our Customer Automated Tracking System (CATS) is where you will find: • Traffic Safety Fact Sheets • FARS/GES Reports • Research Notes and Crash*Stats • Technical Reports • Annual Assessments • Documentation and Manuals for FARS, GES, and NASS-CDS. Customers may also leave a customized data request if you are unable to find what you are looking for.

National Center for Statistics and Analysis (NCSA)  

NCSA, an office of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, is responsible for providing a wide range of analytical and statistical support to NHTSA and the highway safety community at large.

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