Skip to main content
Ride Sober or Get Pulled Over

There's a line between drinking and riding — and the smart ones never cross it.

39% of motorcycle fatalities over the 2019 Labor Day weekend were in crashes that involved a drunk driver

 

If you ride a motorcycle, you already know how much fun riding can be. Make it a point to not only have fun, but to never ride while impaired.

Motorcycle riders are overrepresented in deadly drunk driving crashes. In 2019, motorcyclists once again had the highest percentage of drunk operators compared to operators of other vehicles, like cars or trucks. And, as we've seen during the public health emergency, people are making riskier decisions on the road — including drinking then operating a vehicle.

Help Change the Trend

Logo with text for Ride Sober or Get Pulled Over

During the Labor Day holiday period, we typically see an increase in drunk-driving deaths — and that's why you'll likely see more law enforcement on the roads as part of Ride Sober or Get Pulled Over. The campaign, which runs from August 18-September 6, aims to educate people about the dangers and consequences of driving drunk.

Be Responsible: Have a Plan

  • Plan a safe and sober ride home before drinking alcohol. Don't forget to arrange a safe place to leave your motorcycle.
  • Don’t let someone get on a motorcycle if they've been drinking.
  • If you’re hosting a gathering, make sure all your guests have a sober ride home.

Drunk Riding

It's illegal everywhere to ride drunk. A DUI can set you back, on average, $10,000 and there could be a crash — people could get hurt or killed.

 

Your ability to safely operate a motorcycle — or any vehicle — is reduced anytime you drink. Even a small amount of alcohol reduces brain function and impairs thinking, reasoning and muscle coordination.

The Effects of Alcohol on Riding

Blood Alcohol Concentration Predictable Effects on Riding
 
.02 Decline in visual functions, decline in ability to perform two tasks at the same time
.05 Reduced coordination, reduced ability to track moving objects, difficulty steering, reduced response to emergency driving situations
.08 Reduced concentration, short-term memory loss, lack of speed control, reduced information processing capability, impaired perception
.10 Reduced ability to maintain lane position and brake appropriately
.15 Substantial impairment in motorcycle control, attention to riding task, and in necessary visual and auditory information processing
Blood Alcohol Concentration and Predictable Effects on Riding

If You Feel Different, You Drive Different — Drive High Get a DUI

Did you know that you can also get a DUI for riding under the influence of drugs?

More on Motorcycles