Behaviors and Attitudes

Resources

NHTSA studies behaviors and attitudes in highway safety, focusing on drivers, passengers, pedestrians, and motorcyclists. We identify and measure behaviors involved in crashes or associated with injuries, and develop and refine countermeasures to deter unsafe behaviors and promote safe alternatives.

Our recently published reports are listed chronologically below. To the right are additional resources including Behavioral Research Notes and Traffic Techs.

109 Results
Analysis of SHRP2 Speeding Data: Methods Used to Conduct the Research

This report is a companion report to the Findings Report from the same study (Richard, Lee, Brown, & Landgraf, in press) and describes the methodologies and datasets used to prepare a set of data reductions that supported analyses of speeding behavior. It is a guide to insights for researchers navigating Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) data acquisition and processing. It focuses on methods used to obtain and process trip time-series data, prepare data reductions to extract free-flow episodes and extract speeding episodes. The workflow for preparing the data reductions consisted of three components: data acquisition, data management, and data processing. Lessons learned during the conduct of the research are provided.

Characteristics and Predictors of Occasional Seat Belt Use using Strategic Highway Research Program 2 Data

Despite the recent trend towards higher national seat belt use rates, NHTSA estimates that 10 percent of drivers still only use seat belts occasionally. This study examined occasional seat belt use among participants in the Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) Naturalistic Driving Study. Its exploratory research had the objectives of identifying factors that differentiate seat belt user groups, and identifying impact of situational factors in seat belt use patterns of occasional seat belt users. Seat belt use data was available for 895 SHRP2 participants, and researchers examined belt use within and across each driver’s trips. Two types of occasional seat belt users were those who made pre-trip decisions to buckle or not buckled for the entire trip, and those who made a within-trip decision to buckle or unbuckle for part of the trip.

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey: Seat Belt Report Traffic Tech

This Traffic Safety Facts Traffic Tech briefly summarizes the 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey (MVOSS) Seat Belt Report, showing that although most drivers use seat belts, a sizeable minority (estimated 10% in 2017) choose not to wear belts. Furthermore, while statistics from NHTSA’s National Center for Statistics and Analysis indicate that the percentage of fatally injured passenger vehicle occupants who were unbelted has decreased over the past 10 years from 54%  percent in 2007 to 48%  percent in 2016, the portion remains high at almost half of all passenger vehicle fatalities.

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey: Emergency Medical Services

This Traffic Tech discusses emergency medical services (EMS) results from the 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey of 12,000 people that included 32 questions about EMS. The results f demonstrated the strong link between EMS and motor vehicle crashes and the high degree to which the public values and trusts EMS clinicians. Nearly all (99%) respondents reported confidence in EMS clinicians.

2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey, Volume #4: Emergency Medical Services, Crash Injury Experience, and Other Traffic Safety Topics

This report is the fourth of four reports describing the results of the 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey, which used address-based sampling with multi-mode methodology to produce nationally representative estimates of self-reported behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge related to motor vehicle occupant safety topics among adults 18 and older. Volume #4 covers EMS, crash injury experience, and other traffic safety topics.

Characterizing Ambulance Driver Training in EMS

The technical report, “System Level RESS Safety and Protection Test Procedure Development, Validation, and Assessment” was prepared for NHTSA by Argonne National Laboratory via Interagency Agreement DTNH22-15-X-00513. The project originally initiated in August 2015 with a cost of $550,000. The draft report was received by NHTSA in December of 2017 and circulated for agency comments. These comments were assessed, and appropriate revisions were included in this final report.

Fatigue in Emergency Medical Services Systems

This project produced five evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) for fatigue risk management tailored to Emergency Medical Services (EMS) operations using the National Prehospital EBG Model Process and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology. (1) Fatigue/sleepiness surveys measure and monitor fatigue in EMS personnel; (2) EMS personnel work shifts shorter than 24 hours; (3) EMS personnel have access to caffeine; (4) EMS personnel have the opportunity to nap while on duty; (5) EMS personnel receive education and training to mitigate fatigue and fatigue-related risks. Every minute more than 35 patients are transported in ambulances to hospitals; there are an average of 4,500 crashes involving ambulances a year, resulting in an average of 33 deaths annually.  More than half of EMS personnel report fatigue or poor sleep, with two times the odds of injury and medical error among fatigued EMS personnel.

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey: 911 Systems Traffic Tech

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey: 911 Systems Traffic Tech

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey: Emergency Medical Services Traffic Tech

This Traffic Tech discusses emergency medical services (EMS) results from the 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey of 12,000 people that included 32 questions about EMS. The results f demonstrated the strong link between EMS and motor vehicle crashes and the high degree to which the public values and trusts EMS clinicians. Nearly all (99%) respondents reported confidence in EMS clinicians.

2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey: Volume 1, Methodology Report

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey used address-based sampling with a multi-mode methodology to produce nationally representative estimates of self-reported behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge related to various motor vehicle occupant safety topics among United States adults 18 and older. This volume is third in a series of four volumes describing the survey and the results and discusses findings about child passenger systems and how people use car seats, booster seats and seat belts for children up to age 12. The other MVOSS reports are Volume 1: Methodology Report; Volume 2: Seat Belt Report; and Volume 4: Emergency Medical Services, Crash Injury Experience, and Other Traffic Safety Topics.

For Access to older content please go to our archived Research page.