Behaviors and Attitudes

Resources

NHTSA studies behaviors and attitudes in highway safety, focusing on drivers, passengers, pedestrians, and motorcyclists. We identify and measure behaviors involved in crashes or associated with injuries, and develop and refine countermeasures to deter unsafe behaviors and promote safe alternatives.

Our recently published reports are listed chronologically below. To the right are additional resources including Behavioral Research Notes and Traffic Techs.

124 Results
The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey: Child Passenger Safety Report Traffic Tech

This Traffic Tech briefly summarizes findings from the 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey (MVOSS), NHTSA’s seventh periodic national survey on occupant protection issues. It consisted of two questionnaires, one administered to a nationally representative sample of approximately 12,000 people that included questions about child passenger safety. The second questionnaire of 5,410 completed questionnaires.

Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey Volume 3: Child Passenger Safety Report

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey used address-based sampling with a multi-mode methodology to produce nationally representative estimates of self-reported behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge related to various motor vehicle occupant safety topics among United States adults 18 and older. This volume is third in a series of four volumes describing the survey and the results and discusses findings about child passenger systems and how people use car seats, booster seats and seat belts for children up to age 12. The other MVOSS reports are Volume 1: Methodology Report; Volume 2: Seat Belt Report; and Volume 4: Emergency Medical Services, Crash Injury Experience, and Other Traffic Safety Topics.

2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey Volume #1: Methodology Report

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey (MVOSS) used address-based sampling with a multi-mode methodology to produce nationally representative estimates of self-reported behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge related to various motor vehicle occupant safety topics among United States adults 18 years and older. The current report is the first in a series of four volumes describing the survey and the results: Volume 1: Methodology Report; Volume 2: Seat Belt Report; Volume 3: Child Passenger Safety Report; and Volume 4: Emergency Medical Services, Crash Injury Experience, and Other Traffic Safety Topics Report.

Analysis of SHRP 2 Speeding Data - Findings Report

This report is a companion report to the Findings Report from the same study (Richard, Lee, Brown, & Landgraf, in press) and describes the methodologies and datasets used to prepare a set of data reductions that supported analyses of speeding behavior. It is a guide to insights for researchers navigating Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) data acquisition and processing. It focuses on methods used to obtain and process trip time-series data, prepare data reductions to extract free-flow episodes and extract speeding episodes. The workflow for preparing the data reductions consisted of three components: data acquisition, data management, and data processing. Lessons learned during the conduct of the research are provided.

Analysis of SHRP2 Speeding Data, Traffic Tech

This Traffic Tech summarizes the research from an investigation of driver speeding behavior using the Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) Naturalistic Driving Study data. Situational and driver-specific predictors of speeding were examined using descriptive statistics and regression analyses. In addition, speeding episodes were used to identify different types of speeding and to develop a typology of speeders. Five types of speeders were identified, and these groups differed in terms of their aggregate speeding behavior, demographic characteristics, and attitudes about speeding and risk taking.

Analysis of SHRP2 Speeding Data: Methods Used to Conduct the Research

This report is a companion report to the Findings Report from the same study (Richard, Lee, Brown, & Landgraf, in press) and describes the methodologies and datasets used to prepare a set of data reductions that supported analyses of speeding behavior. It is a guide to insights for researchers navigating Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) data acquisition and processing. It focuses on methods used to obtain and process trip time-series data, prepare data reductions to extract free-flow episodes and extract speeding episodes. The workflow for preparing the data reductions consisted of three components: data acquisition, data management, and data processing. Lessons learned during the conduct of the research are provided.

Characteristics and Predictors of Occasional Seat Belt Use using Strategic Highway Research Program 2 Data

Despite the recent trend towards higher national seat belt use rates, NHTSA estimates that 10 percent of drivers still only use seat belts occasionally. This study examined occasional seat belt use among participants in the Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) Naturalistic Driving Study. Its exploratory research had the objectives of identifying factors that differentiate seat belt user groups, and identifying impact of situational factors in seat belt use patterns of occasional seat belt users. Seat belt use data was available for 895 SHRP2 participants, and researchers examined belt use within and across each driver’s trips. Two types of occasional seat belt users were those who made pre-trip decisions to buckle or not buckled for the entire trip, and those who made a within-trip decision to buckle or unbuckle for part of the trip.

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey: Seat Belt Report Traffic Tech

This Traffic Safety Facts Traffic Tech briefly summarizes the 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey (MVOSS) Seat Belt Report, showing that although most drivers use seat belts, a sizeable minority (estimated 10% in 2017) choose not to wear belts. Furthermore, while statistics from NHTSA’s National Center for Statistics and Analysis indicate that the percentage of fatally injured passenger vehicle occupants who were unbelted has decreased over the past 10 years from 54%  percent in 2007 to 48%  percent in 2016, the portion remains high at almost half of all passenger vehicle fatalities.

The 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey: Emergency Medical Services

This Traffic Tech discusses emergency medical services (EMS) results from the 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey of 12,000 people that included 32 questions about EMS. The results f demonstrated the strong link between EMS and motor vehicle crashes and the high degree to which the public values and trusts EMS clinicians. Nearly all (99%) respondents reported confidence in EMS clinicians.

2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey, Volume #4: Emergency Medical Services, Crash Injury Experience, and Other Traffic Safety Topics

This report is the fourth of four reports describing the results of the 2016 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey, which used address-based sampling with multi-mode methodology to produce nationally representative estimates of self-reported behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge related to motor vehicle occupant safety topics among adults 18 and older. Volume #4 covers EMS, crash injury experience, and other traffic safety topics.

For Access to older content please go to our archived Research page.